Long Weekend in London ~ Day One
England Travel Trips

Long Weekend in London ~ Day One

This post is part of the series England

Other posts in this series:

  1. 30 Fascinating Facts About Oxford
  2. Visit Oxford: A Perfect Day Trip from London
  3. Long Weekend in London ~ Day One (Current)
  4. The Coca-Cola London Eye
  5. Long Weekend in London ~ Day Two

This post is part of the series London

Other posts in this series:

  1. Long Weekend in London ~ Day One (Current)
  2. The Coca-Cola London Eye
  3. Long Weekend in London ~ Day Two
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Learn more about London!

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I made it! The very last person on Earth to visit London. But as people often say – better late, than never Londoning! I was going for the UK trip in May this year. There is no doubt – London has definitely enough to offer, even for a longer period of time than a week. Even so, I’m still keen on exploring as many different places as possible when travelling somewhere for the first time. So, I was planning to stay in London, but I also wanted to visit some other interesting destinations like Windsor (here), Stonehenge (here), Bath (here), and Oxford (here).

 

Room View, The Huttons Hotel
Room View, The Huttons Hotel

 

In fact, I spent three whole days in London and my “scheme” is easily doable for a weekend getaway. Just to be honest right in the beginning of my London Blog Series – I’m not aiming to give you the best London travel guide ever made. Whether I visited every interesting spot in the city, nor I was able to for the restricted time frame of 72 hours. There is nothing to be said about London which has not been said before somewhere on Internet. Therefore I’m just going to share my first-time-London-experience and photo diary with you which is also suitable for somebody who is planning to visit the city for the very first time.

 

Queen's Guard, Buckingham Palace
Queen’s Guard, Buckingham Palace

 

Buckingham Palace

 

First stop in London – the home of the Queen and Prince Philip, the Buckingham Palace! The palace was built during 1705 by the Duke of Buckingham, John Sheffield. Sheffield decided to build the Buckingham building as a residence where he could stay during his visits in London. 100 years later, the Buckingham turned into Palace after some rigorous renovation made by the architect John Nash. Although the building was known as the Buckingham House, it was bought by George III for his wife Queen Charlotte. Since then it became also known as “The Queen’s House” as the Queen gave birth to 14 of her 15 children inside the Buckingham.

 

Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace

 

Since 1837 Buckingham Palace has been the official London residence of all Britain’s monarchs. The first monarch that proclaimed the palace to be the official residence was Queen Victoria who moved there after her coronation in 1837.

 

Buckingham Palace, UK
Buckingham Palace, UK

 

The Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms (19 state rooms, 52 royal bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms), 1,514 doors and 760 windows in the palace (interesting fact is that the windows are cleaned every six weeks). The Ballroom of Buckingham Palace was opened in 1856 and back in the days it was the largest room in London – 36.6m long, 18m wide and 13.5m high!

 

Victoria Memorial, London
Victoria Memorial, London

 

Nowadays the Buckingham Palace is not only the home of the Queen and Prince Philip but also to 800 members of Queen’s staff, residence of the Duke of York and the Earl and Countess of Wessex. Most of all, Buckingham Palace is also used as an office for the administrative work for the monarchy.

 

When visiting the Buckingham palace it’s very easy to tell if the Queen is at home – just look at the flag! The Royal Standard flag means that the Queen is “in the house” and the Union Flag – namely not.

 

Buckingham Palace, London
Buckingham Palace, London

 

Sir James Park

 

Taking a walk in Sir James Park on a sunny day is a great pleasure which you don’t want to miss during your visit in London! It is very unusual practice in London, but the Park wasn’t named after a King or Queen, but after a leper hospital for women called “James the Less”.

 

The 1001 Martenitsa Tree
The 1001 Martenitsa Tree

 

During the reign of Henry VIII the park was as an area for breeding young deer. After the animals were big and old enough, they were shipped off to Hyde Park and Regent’s Park where the King was regularly hunting. The Sir James Park was definitely too small for practicing his favourite hobby.

 

St James's Park
St James’s Park

 

Later in the history, King James I opened an animal show with exotic animals, including crocodiles and elephants. And during the 17th century, King Charles II was very inspired by the Versailles after his visit to France so he decided to rebuild the park imitating the French gardens. He was also the one who opened the park to the public.

 

The beautiful lake that you can enjoy nowadays didn’t exist for six years during the last century. The reason was the WWI as the government decided to drain the lake in 1916 in order to build some temporary government buildings on its ground.

 

St James's Lake
St James’s Lake

 

Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Walk

 

If you are a Princess Diana fan, you might be keen on doing the Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Walk. It is a seven-mile-long walk that includes several famous buildings and places related to the life of the Princess. The memorial walk is marked with plaques that have a rose emblem at the centre and makes this road recognisable at any point. Some of the places along the walk are Buckingham Palace, Kensington Palace, St James’s Palace, and Clarence House.

 

The Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Walk
The Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Walk

 

Robert Clive Memorial, London
Robert Clive Memorial, London

 

The Big Ben, Great George Street
The Big Ben, Great George Street

 

Telephone, London
Telephone, London

 

Methodist Central Hall Westminster, London
Methodist Central Hall Westminster, London

 

Westminster Abbey

 

Probably the most interesting must-visit place to me and one of the most popular landmarks in London is Westminster Abbey. The marvellous church collects the rich history of England since 960 and is actually the most “high-end” cemetery I have ever visited.

 

Westminster Abbey, London
Westminster Abbey, London

 

When to visit the Westminster Abbey: the abbey is opened to the public on Monday to Saturday from 9.30 AM to 3.30 PM and on Sunday for worship only. The tickets cost about 23 €.

 

Westminster Abbey, UK
Westminster Abbey, UK

 

Westminster Abbey, Main Entrance
Westminster Abbey, Main Entrance

 

Here are some of the most interesting facts about the Westminster Abbey:

The first church was established during the 10th century by Benedictine monks.

In 1042 Edward the Confessor rebuilt the church as a burial place for English kings.

Since 1066 many coronations have been held at the abbey. The first one is of Harold Godwinson in January 1066. And the last one of her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

Altogether 39 coronations have taken place at Westminster Abbey.

The current building was built by Henry III in 1245 after he destroyed the original church. Henry III was known as Henry the Builder. During his reign no wars of great significance occurred, so he could focus on many other projects like building the Westminster Abbey.

17 royal weddings have been held at Westminster Abbey. The last one was on 29 April 2011.

The very first royal wedding in the Abbey took place in 11th century as King Henry I married Matilda of Scotland.

Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey

 

Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey

The last royal wedding before the great “wedding-free history” was in 1382 as Richard II married Anne of Bohemia.

The next wedding was nearly 500 years after the last one when Princess Patricia of Connaught married Alexander Ramsay.

For the last 120 years, many royal weddings took place in the abbey including the wedding of King George VI to the Queen Mother, Queen Elizabeth II to Prince Phillip and Prince William to Kate Middleton, etc.

The official name for Westminster Abbey is the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster.

St Margaret's Church, London
St Margaret’s Church, London

And actually, it is not even an abbey but officially a Royal Peculiar.

The oldest Door in the Realm is an oak door by the Chapter House dated to approximately the year 1050.

Perhaps the most famous part of the church is the South Transept of the Abbey as many of the most famous writers of Britain are buried here: Thomas Hardy, Lord Byron, Edmund Spencer etc.

More than 3.300 people have been buried or commemorated at Westminster Abbey. The most famous are Henry III, Edward I, Edward III, Richard II, Henry V, Edward V, Henry VII, Elizabeth I, George II, Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton, and Charles Dickens.

The Big Ben and Coca Cola Eye
The Big Ben and Coca Cola Eye

 

The Big Ben
The Big Ben

 

Westminster Bridge, London
Westminster Bridge, London

 

The Palace of Westminster

 

On the north bank of the River Thames in London lies the House of Parliament, better known as the Palace of Westminster. Three years after re-building the Westminster Abbey, Edward the Confessor commissioned the building as a royal residence in London. In fact, the building that you can see today was designed by Charles Barry in 1840, after the old building was demolished by fire in 1512. The only part that has survived after the fire was the Hall of Westminster. Nowadays the palace has a floor area of 112.476 m² with more than 1.100 rooms, 100 staircases, and 4.8 km of passageways spread over 4 flours. On the ground floor, you can find offices, bars and dining rooms. On the first floor – the debating chambers, lobbies and libraries. The 3 th and 4th floors are occupied by committee rooms and offices.

 

Palace of Westminster, London
Palace of Westminster, London

 

Big Ben Viewpoint, London
Big Ben Viewpoint, London

 

Big Ben

 

There is no doubt, the most prominent landmark of London is the clock tower, Big Ben! Big Ben is located on the north side of the Palace of Westminster. The tower was complete in 1859 and became operational on 7th September. It was formerly known as the Clock Tower and since 2012 its official name is “Elizabeth Tower”. But why Big Ben? Many believe that the tower became its name after Sir Benjamin Hall.  Others deem than the Big Ben was named after Ben Caunt – a heavyweight boxer.

 

Coca-Cola London Eye
Coca-Cola London Eye

 

Some quick facts about the Big Ben:

Big Ben is the world’s largest four-faced chiming clock. The four faces of the clock are 55 meters above ground.

The Big Ben is 96 metres tall, weighs 13.7 tonnes and has 11 floors.

For its construction were needed 850 cubic metres of stone and 2.600 cubic metres of bricks as well as other building materials coming from Yorkshire, France and Rutland.

The clock’s mechanism is regulated by adding pennies for weight.

You can hear the Big Ben every 15 minutes from a radius of up to 8 kilometres.

There are four smaller bells that ring on the quarter hours.

The bell broke during testing in October 1857.

During 1940 the Silent Minute was introduced in London so that the Big Ben would chime for 60 seconds and dedicate the minute to those who died on the battlefields.

The Big Ben has served through the reigns of six monarchs.

At the base of each clock face you can read the following inscription in Latin: “Domine salvam fac Reginam nostrum Victoriam Primam”, or “O Lord, keep safe our Queen Victoria the First”

The free tours of Big Ben have been suspended due to its ongoing renovation and should recommence in 2020.

Hungerford Bridge, London
Hungerford Bridge, London

 

The Royal Horseguards, London
The Royal Horseguards, London

 

View from Hungerford Bridge, London
View from Hungerford Bridge, London

To be continued …

Enjoy the day!

Continue reading this series:

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LillaGreen

Tsvete Popp is a travel and lifestyle blogger based in Innsbruck, Austria. LillaGreen is about living the life of a dreamer with passionate devotion to travel and photography. LillaGreen encourages you to explore the World by creating your own rules to follow.

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Hello, I'm Tsvete Popp and LillaGreen is my sweet escape from reality where I share my adventures from around the World, travel and photo diaries, interesting stories and useful tips. Enjoy with me!

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